Hair Education

Hair Flick Pick: On Her Own Ground


The "mane (main) attraction" that has everyone talking right now is the much-anticipated Netflix flick, "On Her Own Ground," based on the life of Madam C.J. Walker. Octavia Spencer, the Academy Award-winning actor, will star as the trailblazing Madam Read more

Hair Story: Dads, Daughters, & a Whole Lotta Love


This hair story is about Hair Love, an animated short film and picture book by Matthew A. Cherry with illustrations by Vashti Harrison. Hair Love is a celebration of dads, daughters, love, and natural hair. Cherry, a former NFL Read more

Hair Chat: Repair and Protect Hair Treatments


Let's have a hair chat about two treatments that are changing the game for hair repair and protection. Olaplex is a professional treatment designed to strengthen hair damaged by excessive bleach, perms, relaxers, and/or heat styling. It restores compromised hair Read more

What if Your Hair Hates Humidity?


Let's have a hairversation about humidity and what to do on those days when our curls droop, shrink, or  frizz. The following excerpts, originally published by Reader's Digest, may provide a few solutions. As you can guess, the water in Read more

Hair Gear Review: The Microfiber Towel


In between salon visits, if you wash your hair at home, you may want to ditch the t-shirt and consider stocking up on a few microfiber towels to dry your hair. Two divas describe why they made the switch Read more

Sweet as Honey Balayage


  Let's have a hairversation about balayage and one of our favorite shades, honey balayage.  It's sweet, warm, glowing, and gorgeous. Don't confuse balayage, a seamless blend, with ombre, a clear fade line between colors. Elle Magazine describes balayage as the Read more

Back 2 Basics: Tea Tree for Healthy Hair


Class is now in session, and it is time to go back to basics.  Whatever your hair type and texture, Karline's Salon gives an A+ to the Paul Mitchell Tea Tree Collection, shampoos, conditioners, and nourishing oils for healthy Read more

Women's History Month 2019: Hometown Heroes


There is no better way to celebrate Women's History Month 2019 than to shine the spotlight on some of our fantastic clients. The women on this year's list is by no means complete and we look forward to featuring Read more

Hair Trend Weigh In: Unicorn Rainbow Hair


Two years ago, what we thought was a passing whimsical fad, is now a full-blown color trend: Unicorn Rainbow Hair. We're way beyond the My Little Pony obsession and deeply rooted in the power of multicolor hair expression. In What's Read more

7 Foods for Healthy Hair


  In this Transformation Day post, we examine the benefits of seven foods for healthy hair. The excerpt below was originally published at Curly Nikki. You are what you eat. And because your hair is part of you, what you eat Read more

Hair Story: Dads, Daughters, & a Whole Lotta Love

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Hair Story: Hair Love

This hair story is about Hair Love, an animated short film and picture book by Matthew A. Cherry with illustrations by Vashti Harrison. Hair Love is a celebration of dads, daughters, love, and natural hair. Cherry, a former NFL wide receiver turned filmmaker, director, and author sought to combat a negative stereotype that seems to persist with each generation when it comes to Black dads, living and raising their children in America. [Source:Essence]. With a successful Kickstarter campaign, followed by a partnership with Sony Pictures Animation, and a publishing deal with Penguin Books, Hair Love the film debuts in late summer, and you can purchase the Hair Love picture book now.

Check out the backstory. You’ll appreciate and applaud Hair Love even more.

Former NFL Player Challenges the Stereotypes of Black Fathers Through Children’s Book ‘Hair Love’

Author Matthew A. Cherry wants young African American girls and fathers to see themselves represented not only in children’s books but in animation as well.

A few years ago, former NFL player-turned-filmmaker, Matthew A. Cherry noticed a plethora of viral videos of young African American fathers styling their daughter’s natural hair and bonding with them in gender nonconforming ways.

The videos were far more popular than similiar social videos about black fathers connecting with their sons. And that struck Cherry as intersting. Cherry said thousands of users engaged with the videos because people “think this is an anomaly and they have never seen this before.”

“I saw this as a double-edge sword and wanted to normalize it,” Cherry said.

After analyzing the wave of videos, Cherry took to the crowdfunding platform Kickstarter in the summer of 2017 to gain monetary support to create an animated short film about a young black father doing his daughter’s hair for the first time.

Within the first six days of the “Hair Love” film campaign, Cherry exceeded the initial goal of $75,000. And by the end of the 30-day funding period, the drive went on to set today’s record as the highest funded animated short film campaign It raised over $280,000.

Out of the film came the children’s book Hair Love. The book features Zuri, the go-getter preschooler who thinks her big and fluffy hair is magical. And Stephen, the 20-something working father who is committed to his daughter even if it means watching YouTube to learn how to do her textured hair.

Cherry collaborated with Harrison to develop every aspect of both characters. Cherry said he imagined Zuri’s dad as the type of guy people would stereotype. Stephen has a noticeable tattoo on his right arm and wears shoulder length dreadlocks.

“We really wanted him to be a representative of the new wave of young black fathers who may look a certain way, but when it comes to their kids they would do anything for them,” Cherry said.

Growing up in the small town of Onley, Virginia, Harrison said she remembers wanting to have braids or other popular African American hairstyles, but she was too scared to ask her mother for them because she did not want the style to draw additional attention to her skin tone, especially since she was one of a few black people in the city.

Harrison said she is elated to illustrate a story about black hair because celebrating natural hair was something she did not see growing up.

Thank you, Matthew A. Cherry! We’re indebted to and inspired by your Hair Love journey celebrating positive images of men and children, especially young girls, of color.

If you enjoyed this hair story about Hair Love or have curl confession to share, we welcome your feedback in the comments section of this post. We also remind you to #AskKarlinesSalon about the proper care for all types and texture of hair. We’re just a call (561-471-0900) or click away.

Photo credit: Matthew A. Cherry Kickstarter Campaign


Hair Gear Review: The Microfiber Towel

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In between salon visits, if you wash your hair at home, you may want to ditch the t-shirt and consider stocking up on a few microfiber towels to dry your hair. Two divas describe why they made the switch in this hair gear review.

Kayla Boyd:

I started using a microfiber hair towel and now I can\'t wash my hair without one

Having long, textured hair can be a bit of a burden sometimes. I am constantly getting hair all over my bathroom, I go through tons of hair products and my hair takes forever to dry. I have tried many, many different products when it comes to washing, styling and drying.

One product in particular that I swear by is my microfiber hair towel. I firmly believe that everyone with medium to long hair should have one. Of course, regular cotton towels can work fine. But, they NEVER stay on my head, and they make my hair frizzy. A few years ago, I started using the Turbie Twist hair towels and now I never wash my hair without one.

The microfiber material is super absorbent and helps to prevent frizz. It dries hair faster than other towels I’ve used. Plus, it will fit any head size.

Obviously, I love the fact that it cuts down on frizz and dries my hair thoroughly. But, my favorite part is that it keeps my hair out of the way. So, I can brush my teeth, do my makeup and pick out my clothes while my hair is drying. For that alone, it’s worth it.

Lauren Murray:

Microfiber Towel After

Lauren Murray | Photo credit: Phe Morgan

Microfiber towels are known for absorbing a ton of excess water from freshly washed hair, being gentle on curls, eliminating frizz, and enhancing natural curl definition, so it sounded like a winner to me.

I typically use a t-shirt when drying my hair after a wash day, so I grabbed one of my faves and put it to the test against the microfiber towel. When drying my hair, I use the plop method and let the shirt absorb any water for about 10 minutes. I did find that when using the shirt, it didn’t absorb a huge amount of water, so I did have to squeeze the excess out of my hair before I felt comfortable putting product into it for my style. Once I did that, I was good to go. The results I achieved were pretty normal for me, big hair, with slight frizz, and minimal curl definition.

On my second attempt at a Wash & Go, I dried my hair with the DevaCurl DevaTowel Anti-Frizz Microfiber Towel, meant to decrease frizz and enhance curl shape, without increasing breakage or damaging my hair. This was my first attempt at using a microfiber towel to dry my hair, and the difference in materials definitely showed. My hair had noticeably less frizz, and a lot more water was absorbed into the towel, as opposed to when I used the t-shirt. I used the plop method again when drying my hair this time, and let the towel soak up water for about 10 minutes. From there, I went in and applied my styling products and I was good to go.

Microfiber Towel

Lauren Murray | Photo credit: Phe Morgan

The day I used the t-shirt to dry my hair, I did have to use a bit more styling gel to really bring in more curl definition, but when I used the towel I didn’t have to do this. I will say though, I was pleasantly surprised at how easy it was to use the towel, and since I have purchased 3 of them (you can never have too many). lol, I think I have new fave when it comes to drying my hair and prepping for styling.

Visit naturallycurly.com to read Lauren’s entire hair testimony.

Whether you use a t-shirt or microfiber towel, remember to maintain your style with KS Satin, our exclusive line of luxurious fabrics for luxurious and healthy hair. In addition to wrap caps and pillowcases, Karline’s Salon now carries curl caps, scrunchies, and scarves in a variety of colors.  Shop online or at the salon.

Have a great hair day!


Sweet as Honey Balayage

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Izzy Bizu - honey balayage hair

Singer-songrwriter Izzy Bizu | Photo courtesy: Elle.com

 

Let’s have a hairversation about balayage and one of our favorite shades, honey balayage.  It’s sweet, warm, glowing, and gorgeous. Don’t confuse balayage, a seamless blend, with ombre, a clear fade line between colors.

Elle Magazine describes balayage as the “low-key sister” of ombre and recognizes British singer-songwriter Izzy Bizu, who sports honey balayage as a celebrity who does the balayage hairstyle right.

Instead of a perfect fade, keep some ends a little darker to add dimension to your summer look. This will bode especially well when your hair naturally gains texture from an ocean dip.

Read more at Elle.com

According to therighthairstyles.com, honey balayage looks great on almost any base hair color.

Honey balayage is a golden mean between highlights in blonde and brown. The one thing remains tricky – honey is warm, so you need to check if it will flatter your skin tone.

In general, the ideal combination for honey balayage is a light warm complexion with darker hair. The formula works with any eye color. So, if your skin has warm undertones, all shades of honey will be a right fit for you. According to colorists, the best skin tones for this type of highlights are olive, peachy, reddish, and sometimes dark deep skin tones. Golden balayage is also used to hide gray hairs, or as a transition from dark hair color to something lighter and cooler.

One of our clients, pictured below, rocks honey balayage as well as anyone we know.

Karline's Salon Client Honey Balayage

Karline’s Salon Client rocking honey balayage

 

Ready to try honey balayage?  Consult with your hairstylist or #AskKarlinesSalon –  we’re just a call or click away. In the meantime, enjoy these Izzy Bizu tracks, including a fabulous updated version of the Edith Piaf  hit “La Foule.”

 

Have a great hair day and may it be as sweet as honey balayage!


7 Foods for Healthy Hair

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Foods for healthy hair

 

In this Transformation Day post, we examine the benefits of seven foods for healthy hair. The excerpt below was originally published at Curly Nikki.

You are what you eat. And because your hair is part of you, what you eat reflects in the health and state of your hair. If you want hair that is healthy, longer, and stronger you should be paying attention to what you put INSIDE your body, not just what you use on the hair itself. These superfoods will help keep you and your hair looking their best.

1. Water

While this isn’t technically a food, it is still essential to healthy hair since we are primarily made up of water. It is important to stay hydrated to keep all of your body cells working properly. By drinking enough water daily, you are also helping the hydration and moisture levels of your hair as well.

2. Salmon

Salmon is a healthy food superstar; it is an oily fish rich in vitamins D and iron. A study performed at the Tehran University of Medical Sciences related to iron found that, “Women with iron deficiency status are at a risk of telogen hair loss.” Vitamin D is important because it can help stimulate the follicle. If you don’t like fish, flaxseeds are a good vegetarian replacement for these nutrients.

3. Chicken & Eggs

A diet with both contains good sources of protein that will really help your hair! Hair and nails are both composed of protein, which supports body and hair strength. Your hair is the last part of your body that gets the protein, so a lack of this in your diet could affect its state of hair fall and length retention. Eggs are full of B vitamins, especially biotin (B7) and panthenol (B12). Yolks have important vitamins and minerals that the egg whites do not. Chicken is a rich source of protein, as well as several B vitamins that help to strengthen fragile hair. The biotin in these two foods is also important for healthy hair.

4. Beef

Beef is a rich source of zinc, which is helpful in improving hair growth. Zinc deficiency is a cause of hair loss and dryness, so including beef is a great solution. Zinc is also said to help combat premature graying of hair in addition to helping with hair growth according to studies published in Dermatology Practical and Conceptual medical journal. Make sure to eat enough vitamin C in your diet, which will help the zinc absorption. You can find vitamin C in citrus fruits such as oranges and grapefruits. Beef also has high levels of protein with is important for strong hair and scalp health.

5. Nuts

Nuts are a great source of healthy fats, and we need healthy fats to look and feel our best. Walnuts and almonds, in particular, are high in omega-3 fatty acids which can help keep hair strong, and zinc which can help prevent hair loss.

6. Lentils

Lentils are a great vegetarian source of protein. Protein is essential for cell renewal and it is also necessary in restoring the health of red blood cells that supply skin and scalp with much-needed oxygen. Protein is essential for hair health. Lentils also are a good source of iron, zinc, and biotin, too.

7. Carrots & Sweet Potatoes

What do these two have in common? They’re both orange. They are also both excellent sources of Vitamin A. A recent study in Dermatology Practical and Conceptional states that, “dietary vitamin A has been shown to activate hair follicle stem cells.”

Are any of the seven foods for healthy hair in your diet? Share your thoughts (and recipes, please) in the comments section below.


The beYOUtiful Life: Kelly Rowland’s Hair Anthem

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Kelly Rowland Hair Anthem

In this edition of The beYOUtiful Life, for so many reasons we are obsessed with Kelly Rowland’s latest track, Crown.

Crown is a hair anthem for all types and textures and empowers young and old alike to be proud of their locks. Let’s go behind the mike for the backstory. The following excerpt was originally published at yahoo.com.

Kelly Rowland, in partnership with Dove, just released an inspiring new track titled “Crown” that’s all about loving your locks no matter what. The accompanying video shows off a group of young girls shutting down bullies, embracing their beauty and rocking out alongside the Destiny’s Child alum.

Speaking to PEOPLE about the video and her inspiration behind the song, Rowland, 37, says the lyrics “My hair, my crown” comes from “having love for your hair. Gaining the confidence to be able to wear it however you please, or to cut it however you please, have your texture however you please.”

Kelly Rowland Releases Inspiring New \'Crown\' Video with Dove to Help Girls Love Their Hair

Rowland’s billowing curls are on full display in the video alongside girls like Tyrielle Davis and Faith Fennidy, who made headlines when they were ordered to leave school due to having braids or extensions in their hair. “I was pissed, to be honest,” says Rowland of hearing the girls’ stories.

“It’s enough stuff that young people have to go through, and for you to basically be bullying them, a school to be bullying them and telling them what they should look like or how they should wear their hair. You are out of place. You are not their parents.”

…Rowland herself made the decision to rock her natural hair. “My nieces and my son are looking at me. That’s it, that was the whole reason I wanted to go natural. I wanted them to see natural hair on me every and anywhere that I went. Whether it was on TV, wherever it was, I thought that was important.”

What do you think about Rowland’s hair anthem, Crown? Does it inspire you to love your hair? Give it a fab or fair rating in the comments section of this post.


Back2Basics: Stress and Hair Loss

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Back2Basics Hair Care

Class is now in session, and it is time to go back to basics for an elementary lesson on the connection between stress and hair loss. Review the following strands of thought to understand why hair loss occurs and what you can do about it.

Everyone experiences intermittent stress in life. Professional and personal demands, illnesses and trauma can wreak havoc on your mental health.

Sometimes that stress can trigger your body to react in ways that can be frustrating and embarrassing. These include issues like brittle nails, acne breakouts and hair loss.

The type of hair loss that results from physical and emotional stressors is called telogen effluvium, in which large amounts of stress push hair follicles into a resting period. As a result, the hair begins to shed, causing the appearance of thinning, which can be more prominent in certain areas of the scalp than others.

“The hair follicle has its own life cycle — growth, transition, resting and falling out of hair shaft,” said Dr. Julia Tzu, a double board-certified dermatologist and the founder and medical director of Wall Street Dermatology. Stress alters the percentage of hairs in the growth stage and shifts them to the resting, or telogen, stage.

“No one really understands the complex biology that determines the clockwork behind hair cycling,” she continued. “What is known is that stressors do bend the clock and shift hairs towards the telogen phase.”

But this doesn’t necessarily lead to lasting damage. According to Dr. Lauren Ploch, a board-certified dermatologist at the Georgia Dermatology and Skin Cancer Center, telogen effluvium doesn’t always cause permanent hair loss or baldness.

“Complete baldness does not occur unless there is an underlying inflammatory process” like alopecia areata, an autoimmune disease that causes hair loss in patches and can be triggered by severe stress, she said.

You won’t notice a difference in hair loss immediately after experiencing something particularly stressful.

“Telogen effluvium usually occurs within the first three months after a stressful event,” Ploch said. “Usually, the hair loss is a sign that a new hair is growing again at the base of the lost hair, so new hair growth should be apparent three to six months after the initial shedding.”

Is Stress Causing Hair Loss?The average person loses 50 to 100 hairs a day. This is completely normal, and compared with the total number of hairs on your head (about 150,000), the absence of those strands isn’t even noticeable. However, shedding is considered a problem when it becomes excessive.

If you notice more strands than usual coming out when you comb or wash your hair or if you see reduced thickness in one area or throughout your scalp, you should see a doctor, Tzu advised.

As for why hair loss happens during stress, Ploch said that should not be cause for alarm. Because hair growth is not a vital function, you can lose it when you’re stressed out.

“When our body experiences stress, it essentially goes into survival mode and diverts resources away from functions that are nonessential for life such as hair growth and nail growth,” Ploch said.

There’s little data behind whether there are groups that experience more stress-related hair loss than others, but Tzu and Ploch said that new moms are likely to have hair loss, given the level of physiological stress that comes with childbirth.

Easy ways to stop your shedding strands

Making certain lifestyle changes can help. Along with getting enough sleep and spending time doing hobbies you enjoy to reduce stress, Ploch emphasized the importance of getting adequate nutrients.

“Eat a balanced diet that is rich in vitamins and minerals. Be careful with biotin supplementation,” she warned, referring to a memo the FDA released in 2017 about how biotin supplementation can affect lab values. Ploch suggested keeping biotin intake to 35 micrograms or less daily. Biotin, a B vitamin that is commonly used to combat hair loss, can be found naturally in small amounts in foods such as eggs, milk and bananas.

But most important, remember that it is not as crucial to treat hair loss as it is to find healthy ways to handle the stress that causes it. Regular exercise, adequate sleep and a healthy diet can alleviate anxiety. Eating chocolate, hanging with good friends and listening to music can reduce negative moods. (Dozens of other techniques can help as well.) If you think stress is interfering with your daily life, it might be worth trying something like therapy or discussing your mental health with your doctor.

While self-treatment can be an option in mild cases, you should see a dermatologist as soon as possible if you begin to notice excessive shedding.

Ace the principles of healthy hair care. Ask Karline’s Salon about a haircare routine that’s right for you and the stress on your tresses. For more information, call us at 561-471-0900 or make an appointment for your next visit.


KS News Desk: Hair Products and Toxic Chemicals

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KS News Desk: Hair Products and Toxic Chemicals

From the Karline’s Salon news desk, there’s a ticker tape of articles on toxic chemicals found in many popular hair products. A cautionary and true study of what you put on your hair may be harmful to your health. The Silent Spring Institute, a renowned Massachusetts research organization, examined hair products marketed to Black women to help them understand why Black women have increased exposures to hazardous chemicals than other groups and how these high exposures contribute to health disparities in the U.S. population.

According to Reuters Health, “the findings could explain at least in part why African-American women go through puberty earlier and suffer from higher rates of asthma and reproductive diseases than other groups.”

Here is a summary of the study.

The study, which was conducted by the Silent Spring Institute and published in the journal Environmental Research, examined 18 different products geared towards black women, like hot oil treatments, anti-frizz hair polishes, leave-in conditioners, root stimulators, hair lotions and hair relaxers. The results found all of the products tested contained hazardous chemicals, including parabens, a type of preservative that can interfere with a woman’s natural estrogen level and has been linked to breast cancer, and phthalates, which can damage the liver, kidneys, lungs and reproductive system.

“Chemicals in hair products, and beauty products in general, are mostly untested and largely unregulated,” said Jessica Helm, Ph.D., the study’s lead author and a scientist at Silent Spring, in a statement. “This study is a first step toward uncovering what harmful substances are in products frequently used by Black women, so we can better understand what’s driving some of the health issues they’re facing.”

The study’s findings are consistent with data from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, which found black women have higher levels of some phthalates and parabens in their bodies compared with white women. The findings could help researchers understand why black women may experience early puberty and have higher rates of hormone-related issues such as uterine fibroids, infertility, and pre-term births. “We know from previous research that black women suffer disproportionately from hormone-related health problems,” said Helm.

“Black women are over-exposed and under-protected from toxic chemicals,” says Janette Robinson Flint, executive director of Black Women for Wellness. Black women also purchase and use more hair products than other groups. In fact, a Nielsen study found African Americans spent $54 million on ethnic hair and beauty products last year.

Helm also shared advice for black women looking to find safer options for hair products. “Look for opportunities to use fewer products,” she said. “When choosing a product, know which products are made with plants or that are fragrance-, phthalate- and paraben-free.” Furthermore, you women of color can download the Detox Me app for more tips on how to reduce exposure to harmful chemicals in personal care products.

Here are other highlights from the study:

  • All products tested contained fragrance chemicals
  • 78% contained parabens
  • 72% of products contained parabens and diethyl phthalate
  • 84% of the chemicals detected were not listed on the product label
  • 11 products contained seven chemicals prohibited in the European Union (EU) or regulated under California’s Proposition 65
  • Hair relaxers marketed at children contained the highest levels of five chemicals prohibited in the EU or regulated under Proposition 65
  • Parabens, fragrances, nonylphenols, and diethyl phthalate were commonly found in root stimulators, hair lotions and hair relaxers.
  • Cyclosiloxanes were more frequently detected in anti-frizz products and at the highest concentrations of any chemical measured.

 

Download and print this list of hair products that contain toxic chemicals. If you use any of them, stop and discard them immediately.  Please #AskKarlinesSalon about products that are safe for your hair and your health. We’re just a call (561-471-0900) or click away.


Back2Basics: What’s Your Hair Type?

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Back2Basics Hair Care

Class is now in session, and it is time to go back to basics for an elementary lesson on hair type. Review the following strands of thought to understand your type of hair.

Hairstylist Andre Walker is responsible for the hair typing system, ranging from type 1 through type 4, which he came up with in the ’90s. Over the years, curly hair communities have made modifications to add in more hair types. In those communities, calling yourself a 2C or 4B can instantly tell other curly girls a lot about you (and your routine).

Wondering how to find out your hair type? The best way to determine your hair type is to wash and condition in the shower, blot your hair with an old t-shirt (this won’t promote frizz the way a towel does), and let your hair air dry so you can see its natural shape, says Fred Connors, owner of FRED.nyc salon.

Type 1 Hair Type

Straight hair, do care. If you have type 1 hair, that means you’ve got that smooth, sleek, straight hair that so many women need a flat iron to achieve.

1A: “This is the straightest of straight hair types,” says Connors. “This hair type is quite uncommon. It’s pin-straight with no bends or waves. It has a great amount of difficulty holding curl.”

1B/1C: “These are more common for straight hair types,” says Connors. “Types 1B and 1C hair tend to curl under toward the base and hold curl.” Type 1C has slightly more curl than type 1B.

1B/1C: “These are more common for straight hair types,” says Connors. “Types 1B and 1C hair tend to curl under toward the base and hold curl.” Type 1C has slightly more curl than type 1B.

Type 1 Celeb Inspiration: Lucy Liu and Gwyneth Paltrow

Type 2 Hair Type

Beachy waves FTW. That’s exactly what you have if your hair falls within the type 2 umbrella, no dip in the ocean required.

2A: “Type 2A is wavier than straight hair but not curly,” says Connors. “It’s a very loosely defined wave. There’s no strong S shape.”

2B: Your hair has more defined waves than type 2A, with the distance between waves being shorter than it is for type 2A hair, says Connors.

2C: “Your hair looks curlier than types 2A and 2B, but it’s still a wave,” says Connors. You’ll notice an even shorter distance between waves than types 2A and 2B hair, as well as a more defined S shape.

Type 2 Celeb Inspiration: Jessica Alba and Drew Barrymore

Type 3 Hair Type

Hey there, curly hair! From light curls to tight curls, here’s what you need to know about curl patterns 3A–3C.

3A: Whereas wavy hair produces an S shape, curly hair produces a circle, says Connor. Type 3A hair is the loosest of the type 3 curl types and has the circumference of a piece of sidewalk chalk, says Connors.

3B: Your curls are tighter than type 3A, with about the circumference of a marker, says Connors.

3C: Your tightly-packed curls have the circumference of a pencil, says Connors. Think corkscrew curls!

Type 3 Celeb Inspiration: Julianna Margulies and Alicia Keys

Type 4 Hair Type

Nice to see you, kinky hair. Type 4 hair is usually thin, coarse, and packed with tight kinks. Here’s how to tell which type of kinky hair you have.

4A: “Your kink is really, really tight and in an S pattern,” says Connors.

4B: “Your kink is at a sharper angle than type 4A hair and in a Z pattern,” says Connors.

4C: “Your hair pattern is very irregular,” says Connors. “It’s not crimped or curved.” It’s similar to type 4B, just less defined.

Type 4 Celeb Inspiration: Viola Davis and Janelle Monae

What else affects hair type?

While figuring out where you fall on the 1A–4C spectrum will go a long way toward allowing you to put together the right haircare and styling routine, there are four other factors to consider as well.

Do you apply and apply and apply product only for it to seem like it’s just sitting on the surface of your hair? This might have to do with your hair’s porosity. “This is how absorbent your hair is,” says Rhodes Douglas. More specifically, porosity refers to how well your hair holds in moisture, water, and product.

To figure out whether your hair has low or high porosity, take a small section of hair and stretch it out. Slide a finger up and down your hair shaft. If your hair feels rough, that means you have low porosity and your hair doesn’t hold in moisture very well; if your hair feels smooth, that means you have high porosity, says Rhodes Douglas.

When your hair has good elasticity, that means it’s bouncy and full of life. “When you tug on a strand, you should be able to stretch it out and then it’ll go back,” says Rhodes Douglas. Chemicals, like those in hair dye, can mess with your elasticity and cause your hair to become limp, she adds.

To tell how much elasticity your hair has, try this little experiment: When your hair is wet, take a piece and stretch it out. If it returns to its original length once you release it, that means you have good elasticity.

Your hair density simply means how much hair you have. You can figure out whether you have low or high density hair by measuring the circumference of your ponytail, says Rhodes Douglas. The larger your ponytail circumference, the higher hair density you have. “People think they have a ton of hair, but often they don’t,” says Rhodes Douglas. “When gathered together, do you have a copious amount of hair or is it surprisingly less than you thought?”

It’s totally possible (and actually really common!) to have more than one type of curl pattern, says Rhodes Douglas. This is known as curl variance. “Often within curly hair types, you see tight curly hair and a more relaxed curl type,” says Connor. “If you have a mixture of manageable and difficult to manage hair types, I would use product for the hair type [that’s most difficult to manage].”

Ace the principles of healthy hair care. Ask Karline’s Salon about a routine that’s right for your hair type. For more information, call us at 561-471-0900 or make an appointment for your next visit.


Transformation Day: The Benefits Of Flaxseed Oil For Hair!

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According to registered dietitian and healthline.com contributor, Rachael Link, flaxseeds provide many health benefits and flaxseed oil, made from flaxseeds that have been ground and pressed to release their natural oil, has a wide variety of uses, ranging from cooking to skin care. In this Transformation Day post, let’s look at the benefits of flaxseed oil for hair.

The flaxseed oil is somewhat lesser known when it comes to the benefits that it owes to the hair. …Before getting to anything, let us first know what flaxseed oil really is and what all does it contains. Following are some of the essential nutrients that the flaxseed oil contains:

1. Omega-3 Fatty Acids

As mentioned above, flaxseed oil is a great source of omega-3 fatty acids. This nutrient is really good for maintaining a good heart health. The non-vegetarian people can get their share of omega-3 fatty acids from the chicken and the fish. However, the vegetarian lot can get theirs from the flaxseeds or flaxseed oil.

2. Fiber

Flaxseed is widely known to constitute both soluble and the insoluble kinds of fiber. This is great when one wants a proper digestion and a healthy bowel movement. Using flaxseed oil or flaxseeds, in general, can help you maintain a happy stomach.

3. Lignans

Flaxseeds are also a rich source of anti-oxidants. In fact, they are the largest source of it and can be said to contain about 8000 times the antioxidants than any other plant-based foods contain.

But Why Flaxseed Oil For Hair?

Including all the good nutrients that the flaxseeds and the flaxseed oil contain, it can be said that flaxseed oil for natural hair is really a thing when we are talking about hair health. Since the omega-3 fatty acids and the proteins form up the main parts of our hair strands, it must get pretty obvious that this oil can prove to be really beneficial for healthy hair.

Here are some of the best benefits that the flaxseed oil has to offer for your hair.

  • Flaxseed oil has a great amount of omega-3 fatty acids, omega-4 fatty acids, minerals and essential vitamins that are required for a healthy hair growth.
  • Some people use Flaxseed oil for hair growth. This is because even just 2 spoons of it are enough for your daily fatty acids and vitamins requirement. Supplying the hair strands their much essential nutrients, the flaxseed oil is great when you are looking for something to trigger your hair growth.
  • Flaxseed oil doesn’t only help with hair growth, but it also prevents hair fall. Since the fatty acids make up for hair growth, the essential minerals help in making the hair follicle stronger and hence, eliminate hair fall.
  • Using flaxseed oil regularly on the hair will get rid of any flakiness or visible dandruff from the scalp.
  • Flaxseed oil is also helpful in giving your hair strands a certain shine and luster. This is because it moisturizes your scalp and helps in the formation of hydrated hair. This brings out a natural shine in the hair.
  • A weekly warm flaxseed oil hair massage can do all the above-mentioned tricks when done regularly every week.

 

You Will Be Amazed To See The Benefits Of Flaxseed Oil For Hair!

Have you tried or are you thinking about trying flaxeed oil? For a healthy hair opinion, #AskKarlinesSalon! We’re just a call (561-471-0900) or click away.


Back2Basics: Summertime Care for Relaxed Hair

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Back2Basics Hair Care

 

Class is now in session, and it is time to go back to basics for a lesson on summertime care for relaxed hair.  Review the following tips and strands of thought to keep your relaxed hair healthy during the summer months.

Summer has officially arrived, and while we’re excited for long, sunny days, dining al fresco, and taking as many trips to the beach or pool as we can, we also know the struggle can be real for ladies with relaxed hair.

It’s no secret that the sun, salt water, chlorine and other factors can take a toll on your tresses, so the question is: How can you best protect relaxed hair during the summer months?

Everything You Ever Wanted To Know About How To Keep Relaxed Hair Healthy In The SummerGetty images

To answer this question, we tapped Corenza Handy for her expert guidance. With over 15 years of experience as both a stylist and an entrepreneur,… Handy was the perfect person to give us the lowdown on healthy hair secrets for relaxed hair.

1. Wash Your Hair Weekly and Double Up on Moisture

It’s very important to wash your hair every week. Handy recommends Design Essentials‘ shampoo formulated with oat or honey,… If you need extra moisture throughout the week, use something light that gives hair great shine…

2. Get Ends Trimmed Regularly

Trimming and taking care of your ends is essential to hair growth. While some people feel like not cutting or trimming your hair will make it grow longer, that’s completely false. “As our hair grows it starts to split, so trimming your hair when necessary is definitely important,” Hardy reminds.

3. Go Easy on Heat Styling

Limiting heat is important. Our hair tends to be naturally dry, so when we constantly put heat on it, it can dry it out even more. When you do use heat, however, make sure to use a protectant. Also, focus on making your style last longer by taking preventive measures such as wrapping your hair with a silk scarf or sleeping on a silk pillowcase to avoid brittle and frizzy hair. Hardy recommends this protectant from Design Essentials…

4. Drink Water and Pay Attention to Your Diet

Some of us are blessed to have good genes and our hair flourishes whether or not we eat junk all day, but for the rest of us, your diet and vitamins play a big part in the health of your hair. Handy encourages taking B12 vitamins and omega supplements for healthy hair, skin and nails. Also, drink lots of water because it’s another source of moisture for your hair and scalp.

5. Avoid Overprocessing

“Relaxers are definitely important in terms of timing,” says Handy. She recommends getting a touch-up every 6-8 weeks, but depending on the speed of hair growth, a touch up may be needed sooner. If you sweat a lot then your hair may revert faster. She also says that those with shorter hair will notice new growth sooner, but resist the urge to touch-up your hair too often.

6. Wait Awhile Before Installing Protective Styles

A fresh relaxer followed by braids or a weave won’t end well for you. “I don’t suggest getting your hair relaxed and then braiding one or even two weeks later. When you get a protective style, you’re covering your hair up, so you can’t wash it [properly] every week or add moisture,” she says.

7. If You Are Having Hair Issues, Speak To Your Stylist

Issues like breakage and thinning hair shouldn’t automatically be attributed to getting a relaxer. Handy insists, “you have to figure out why it’s happening.” It can stem from stress, poor hair care, or be something else. Have a consult with your stylist so he or she can figure out what’s causing the problem.

Ace the principles, opportunities, and challenges of healthy hair care. Ask Karline’s Salon about the hair maintenance program that includes a minimum of four visits at an exceptional price.  For more information, call us at 561-471-0900 or make an appointment for your next visit.


Karline’s Salon
2247 Palm Beach Lakes Boulevard, Suite 209, West Palm Beach, FL 33409
561.471.0900
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