hair diversity

The beYOUtiful Life: Hair Notes from the 2019 BET Awards


The 2019 BET Awards celebration was one for the record books, and when it comes to hair, we must say, "they came to slay." Here are a few hair notes and observations. Lizzo Lizzo's natural hair is the "Glow-up!" If you Read more

Hair Flick Pick: On Her Own Ground


The "mane (main) attraction" that has everyone talking right now is the much-anticipated Netflix flick, "On Her Own Ground," based on the life of Madam C.J. Walker. Octavia Spencer, the Academy Award-winning actor, will star as the trailblazing Madam Read more

Hair Story: Dads, Daughters, & a Whole Lotta Love


This hair story is about Hair Love, an animated short film and picture book by Matthew A. Cherry with illustrations by Vashti Harrison. Hair Love is a celebration of dads, daughters, love, and natural hair. Cherry, a former NFL Read more

Hair Chat: Repair and Protect Hair Treatments


Let's have a hair chat about two treatments that are changing the game for hair repair and protection. Olaplex is a professional treatment designed to strengthen hair damaged by excessive bleach, perms, relaxers, and/or heat styling. It restores compromised hair Read more

What if Your Hair Hates Humidity?


Let's have a hairversation about humidity and what to do on those days when our curls droop, shrink, or  frizz. The following excerpts, originally published by Reader's Digest, may provide a few solutions. As you can guess, the water in Read more

Hair Gear Review: The Microfiber Towel


In between salon visits, if you wash your hair at home, you may want to ditch the t-shirt and consider stocking up on a few microfiber towels to dry your hair. Two divas describe why they made the switch Read more

Sweet as Honey Balayage


  Let's have a hairversation about balayage and one of our favorite shades, honey balayage.  It's sweet, warm, glowing, and gorgeous. Don't confuse balayage, a seamless blend, with ombre, a clear fade line between colors. Elle Magazine describes balayage as the Read more

Back 2 Basics: Tea Tree for Healthy Hair


Class is now in session, and it is time to go back to basics.  Whatever your hair type and texture, Karline's Salon gives an A+ to the Paul Mitchell Tea Tree Collection, shampoos, conditioners, and nourishing oils for healthy Read more

Women's History Month 2019: Hometown Heroes


There is no better way to celebrate Women's History Month 2019 than to shine the spotlight on some of our fantastic clients. The women on this year's list is by no means complete and we look forward to featuring Read more

Hair Trend Weigh In: Unicorn Rainbow Hair


Two years ago, what we thought was a passing whimsical fad, is now a full-blown color trend: Unicorn Rainbow Hair. We're way beyond the My Little Pony obsession and deeply rooted in the power of multicolor hair expression. In What's Read more

Hair Diversity in the U.S. Navy

Posted on by webmaster in Hair Styles Leave a comment

Hair Diversity in the U.S. Navy

In this Transformation Day post, we salute the U.S. Navy, which finally updated its grooming standards, allowing servicewomen more flexibility in hairstyles. The policy shift has been a long time coming, and it’s not perfect, but it’s a start and step in the right direction that recognizes the diversity and beauty of all hair types and textures.

Lt. Tiffany D. Pearson shares her view on this change as a woman of color in the Navy.

What The Navy’s New Hair Policy Means To Me As A Black WomanPhoto: MC2 Alora Blosch and MC1 TJ Godbold

We can wear ponytails and locs in uniform tomorrow?! I couldn’t believe what I was reading — the U.S. Navy was finally allowing the heretofore unimaginable, a new shift in hair regulations. Though I’ve recently opted for a low fade, I celebrated with black women throughout the fleet when I learned yet another style intrinsic to my heritage and conducive to healthy hair was no longer deemed “unprofessional.” For me, this policy shift was a détente of sorts — an easing of tension between my natural hair and Navy regulations. Reconciliation between my service and myself has removed the burden competing factors once presented.

The new Navy policy sets forth the most significant changes to the hair grooming regulations I’ve seen in my eight years of enlisted and commissioned service. The policy seems to take into consideration the multicultural diversity of the U.S. Navy. It offers a broader and more inclusive version of what it means to “look professional.”

The chief of naval operations (CNO) made the announcement regarding this ambitious policy change surrounded by black female sailors who took part in the policy working group. In many ways, that video symbolized for me a shift in perspective. It showed me a Navy comprised of sailors from all walks of life, socioeconomic statuses, and backgrounds. By including a number of diverse voices in the policy process, the Navy was able to produce a far-reaching policy that brought about more equity — a recognition that there is nothing inherently unprofessional about my hair in its natural state. Valuing core facets of each sailor elicits a sense of dignity, as they serve with honor, courage, and commitment. No need to sacrifice personhood to do so.

I entered Navy training in 2011 with a low-cut fade and a desire for adventure. One year, a few relaxers, and many days of “hat hair” later, I decided transitioning back to my natural curls was a must. The response was not good. “Did you stick your finger in a light socket?” asked a senior officer. I’d planned to take a year in transitioning, but the constant negative feedback resulted in a swift cut — a small Afro that drew fewer comments and less scrutiny.

While the new regulations aren’t perfect (still no faux locs!), they do provide an expanded vision of what “professional” can look like, including hair that looks like mine. Truthfully, this has removed an unnecessary stressor from my life and opened up a world of possibilities. Who knows, I may eventually start locs of my own or opt to wear a wig. I may go back to styles I’m familiar with. Whatever I choose to do, the options have expanded, and while not perfect, the tension between my hair and Navy regulations has eased.

What do you think of the Navy’s new hair policy? Share your thoughts or thank the women who serve in the comments section below.


Hair Story: Maya Rudolph

Posted on by webmaster in KS Commentary Leave a comment
Hair Story-Maya Rudolph

Photo Credit: Wikimedia

Maya Rudolph is one heck of an actor and comedian. Remember her “on-point” SNL impersonation of Donatella Versace, hilarious bridal salon scene in Bridesmaids, or tender moments in Away We Go? But beyond the screen, Maya, the daughter of record producer Richard Rudolph and songstress extraordinaire the late Minnie Riperton, has a hair story that will make you laugh, cry, and appreciate our hair diversity.

Maya Rudolph Opens Up About Her Struggle With Natural Hair In The Comedy World

Photo: Kevin Mazur/Getty Images.

In an interview with the New York Times Magazine, Rudolph opened up about the struggle of being mixed-race in the sketch comedy world, and the jokes it led to at her expense.

“My hair was natural when I started Saturday Night Live, but it was so thick to get under the wigs,” Rudolph explained. Because of this, she had to set aside “several hours a week” to change its texture, which turned into a weekly blow-out appointment with the hair department.

“[The blow-dry station] was on the same hallway as a lot of the dudes’ dressing rooms. And every [expletive] Friday night, we’d hear some [expletive] white guy walking down the hall going, ‘Is something burning in here? What’s burning?’” Rudolph said. “I’m like — ‘I’m. Get-ting. My. Hair. Done.’”

She also reflected on her pre-SNL days, which weren’t any better in terms of how others viewed her hair. “Every time I’d work, they’d be like, ‘I really don’t — like, can I touch? — I really don’t know what to do with your hair.’ They would just say the most awful, disgusting things,” she said.

Unfortunately, Rudolph’s experiences aren’t isolated incidents. According to the “Good Hair” study, “a majority of people, regardless of race and gender, hold some bias towards women of color based on their hair.” Key findings also showed that Black women suffer more anxiety around hair issues, spend more money on hair care than any other racial group, and are almost twice as likely to feel pressure to straighten their hair.

Like Rudolph, women of color shouldn’t feel forced to conform to a beauty standard that suppresses their cultural roots in order to be accepted at work. Nor should they have to endure ignorant comments and “jokes” — someone else’s hair should be the least of anyone’s concerns.

If you enjoyed Maya’s curl confession or have one to share, we welcome your feedback in the comments section of this post. We also remind you to #AskKarlinesSalon about the proper care for all types and texture of hair. We’re just a call (561-471-0900) or click away.


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