hair routine

KS Cares - Children's Services Council of Palm Beach County


In this very special holiday post, we'd like to tell you about Children's Services Council of Palm Beach County, a funding resource for programs and services that improve the lives of children and their families. Moreover, we'd like to Read more

5 Tips to Maintain Healthy and Full Hair as You Age


Courtesy of doctortipster.com. here are five tips to maintain healthy and full hair as you age. There's an old saying that time waits for nobody, but we can definitely make the hair fall wait! Rare as it may be, we Read more

Back2Basics: Stress and Hair Loss


Class is now in session, and it is time to go back to basics for an elementary lesson on the connection between stress and hair loss. Review the following strands of thought to understand why hair loss occurs and Read more

Never Have You Ever Used Yogurt on Your Hair?


Never have you ever used yogurt on your hair? There are a few strands of thought on this popular dairy product. Natural yogurt is full of protein and, according to stylecraze.com, it is a common natural hair care ingredient Read more

Hair Diversity in the U.S. Navy


In this Transformation Day post, we salute the U.S. Navy, which finally updated its grooming standards, allowing servicewomen more flexibility in hairstyles. The policy shift has been a long time coming, and it's not perfect, but it's a start Read more

KS News Desk: Hair Products and Toxic Chemicals


From the Karline's Salon news desk, there's a ticker tape of articles on toxic chemicals found in many popular hair products. A cautionary and true study of what you put on your hair may be harmful to your health. Read more

Hair Story: Maya Rudolph


Maya Rudolph is one heck of an actor and comedian. Remember her "on-point" SNL impersonation of Donatella Versace, hilarious bridal salon scene in Bridesmaids, or tender moments in Away We Go? But beyond the screen, Maya, the daughter of Read more

Hair Flick Pick: ‘Nappily Ever After’ On Netflix


The "mane (main) attraction" that has everyone talking right now is the Netflix comedy-drama, Nappily Ever After. It's our pick for a hair flick for two reasons. One, it stars actor Sanaa Lathan of The Best Man, Love and Read more

Hair Trend Weigh In: Autumn-Inspired Color


Not that it makes a difference to those of us who live in South Florida's tropical paradise, but the fall season is here, and as the saying goes, life's too short to have boring hair. Now, let's go with the Read more

Back2Basics: What's Your Hair Type?


Class is now in session, and it is time to go back to basics for an elementary lesson on hair type. Review the following strands of thought to understand your type of hair. Hairstylist Andre Walker is responsible for the Read more

Back2Basics: Stress and Hair Loss

Posted on by webmaster in Hair Education Comments Off on Back2Basics: Stress and Hair Loss

Back2Basics Hair Care

Class is now in session, and it is time to go back to basics for an elementary lesson on the connection between stress and hair loss. Review the following strands of thought to understand why hair loss occurs and what you can do about it.

Everyone experiences intermittent stress in life. Professional and personal demands, illnesses and trauma can wreak havoc on your mental health.

Sometimes that stress can trigger your body to react in ways that can be frustrating and embarrassing. These include issues like brittle nails, acne breakouts and hair loss.

The type of hair loss that results from physical and emotional stressors is called telogen effluvium, in which large amounts of stress push hair follicles into a resting period. As a result, the hair begins to shed, causing the appearance of thinning, which can be more prominent in certain areas of the scalp than others.

“The hair follicle has its own life cycle — growth, transition, resting and falling out of hair shaft,” said Dr. Julia Tzu, a double board-certified dermatologist and the founder and medical director of Wall Street Dermatology. Stress alters the percentage of hairs in the growth stage and shifts them to the resting, or telogen, stage.

“No one really understands the complex biology that determines the clockwork behind hair cycling,” she continued. “What is known is that stressors do bend the clock and shift hairs towards the telogen phase.”

But this doesn’t necessarily lead to lasting damage. According to Dr. Lauren Ploch, a board-certified dermatologist at the Georgia Dermatology and Skin Cancer Center, telogen effluvium doesn’t always cause permanent hair loss or baldness.

“Complete baldness does not occur unless there is an underlying inflammatory process” like alopecia areata, an autoimmune disease that causes hair loss in patches and can be triggered by severe stress, she said.

You won’t notice a difference in hair loss immediately after experiencing something particularly stressful.

“Telogen effluvium usually occurs within the first three months after a stressful event,” Ploch said. “Usually, the hair loss is a sign that a new hair is growing again at the base of the lost hair, so new hair growth should be apparent three to six months after the initial shedding.”

Is Stress Causing Hair Loss?The average person loses 50 to 100 hairs a day. This is completely normal, and compared with the total number of hairs on your head (about 150,000), the absence of those strands isn’t even noticeable. However, shedding is considered a problem when it becomes excessive.

If you notice more strands than usual coming out when you comb or wash your hair or if you see reduced thickness in one area or throughout your scalp, you should see a doctor, Tzu advised.

As for why hair loss happens during stress, Ploch said that should not be cause for alarm. Because hair growth is not a vital function, you can lose it when you’re stressed out.

“When our body experiences stress, it essentially goes into survival mode and diverts resources away from functions that are nonessential for life such as hair growth and nail growth,” Ploch said.

There’s little data behind whether there are groups that experience more stress-related hair loss than others, but Tzu and Ploch said that new moms are likely to have hair loss, given the level of physiological stress that comes with childbirth.

Easy ways to stop your shedding strands

Making certain lifestyle changes can help. Along with getting enough sleep and spending time doing hobbies you enjoy to reduce stress, Ploch emphasized the importance of getting adequate nutrients.

“Eat a balanced diet that is rich in vitamins and minerals. Be careful with biotin supplementation,” she warned, referring to a memo the FDA released in 2017 about how biotin supplementation can affect lab values. Ploch suggested keeping biotin intake to 35 micrograms or less daily. Biotin, a B vitamin that is commonly used to combat hair loss, can be found naturally in small amounts in foods such as eggs, milk and bananas.

But most important, remember that it is not as crucial to treat hair loss as it is to find healthy ways to handle the stress that causes it. Regular exercise, adequate sleep and a healthy diet can alleviate anxiety. Eating chocolate, hanging with good friends and listening to music can reduce negative moods. (Dozens of other techniques can help as well.) If you think stress is interfering with your daily life, it might be worth trying something like therapy or discussing your mental health with your doctor.

While self-treatment can be an option in mild cases, you should see a dermatologist as soon as possible if you begin to notice excessive shedding.

Ace the principles of healthy hair care. Ask Karline’s Salon about a haircare routine that’s right for you and the stress on your tresses. For more information, call us at 561-471-0900 or make an appointment for your next visit.


Back2Basics: What’s Your Hair Type?

Posted on by webmaster in Hair Education Leave a comment

Back2Basics Hair Care

Class is now in session, and it is time to go back to basics for an elementary lesson on hair type. Review the following strands of thought to understand your type of hair.

Hairstylist Andre Walker is responsible for the hair typing system, ranging from type 1 through type 4, which he came up with in the ’90s. Over the years, curly hair communities have made modifications to add in more hair types. In those communities, calling yourself a 2C or 4B can instantly tell other curly girls a lot about you (and your routine).

Wondering how to find out your hair type? The best way to determine your hair type is to wash and condition in the shower, blot your hair with an old t-shirt (this won’t promote frizz the way a towel does), and let your hair air dry so you can see its natural shape, says Fred Connors, owner of FRED.nyc salon.

Type 1 Hair Type

Straight hair, do care. If you have type 1 hair, that means you’ve got that smooth, sleek, straight hair that so many women need a flat iron to achieve.

1A: “This is the straightest of straight hair types,” says Connors. “This hair type is quite uncommon. It’s pin-straight with no bends or waves. It has a great amount of difficulty holding curl.”

1B/1C: “These are more common for straight hair types,” says Connors. “Types 1B and 1C hair tend to curl under toward the base and hold curl.” Type 1C has slightly more curl than type 1B.

1B/1C: “These are more common for straight hair types,” says Connors. “Types 1B and 1C hair tend to curl under toward the base and hold curl.” Type 1C has slightly more curl than type 1B.

Type 1 Celeb Inspiration: Lucy Liu and Gwyneth Paltrow

Type 2 Hair Type

Beachy waves FTW. That’s exactly what you have if your hair falls within the type 2 umbrella, no dip in the ocean required.

2A: “Type 2A is wavier than straight hair but not curly,” says Connors. “It’s a very loosely defined wave. There’s no strong S shape.”

2B: Your hair has more defined waves than type 2A, with the distance between waves being shorter than it is for type 2A hair, says Connors.

2C: “Your hair looks curlier than types 2A and 2B, but it’s still a wave,” says Connors. You’ll notice an even shorter distance between waves than types 2A and 2B hair, as well as a more defined S shape.

Type 2 Celeb Inspiration: Jessica Alba and Drew Barrymore

Type 3 Hair Type

Hey there, curly hair! From light curls to tight curls, here’s what you need to know about curl patterns 3A–3C.

3A: Whereas wavy hair produces an S shape, curly hair produces a circle, says Connor. Type 3A hair is the loosest of the type 3 curl types and has the circumference of a piece of sidewalk chalk, says Connors.

3B: Your curls are tighter than type 3A, with about the circumference of a marker, says Connors.

3C: Your tightly-packed curls have the circumference of a pencil, says Connors. Think corkscrew curls!

Type 3 Celeb Inspiration: Julianna Margulies and Alicia Keys

Type 4 Hair Type

Nice to see you, kinky hair. Type 4 hair is usually thin, coarse, and packed with tight kinks. Here’s how to tell which type of kinky hair you have.

4A: “Your kink is really, really tight and in an S pattern,” says Connors.

4B: “Your kink is at a sharper angle than type 4A hair and in a Z pattern,” says Connors.

4C: “Your hair pattern is very irregular,” says Connors. “It’s not crimped or curved.” It’s similar to type 4B, just less defined.

Type 4 Celeb Inspiration: Viola Davis and Janelle Monae

What else affects hair type?

While figuring out where you fall on the 1A–4C spectrum will go a long way toward allowing you to put together the right haircare and styling routine, there are four other factors to consider as well.

Do you apply and apply and apply product only for it to seem like it’s just sitting on the surface of your hair? This might have to do with your hair’s porosity. “This is how absorbent your hair is,” says Rhodes Douglas. More specifically, porosity refers to how well your hair holds in moisture, water, and product.

To figure out whether your hair has low or high porosity, take a small section of hair and stretch it out. Slide a finger up and down your hair shaft. If your hair feels rough, that means you have low porosity and your hair doesn’t hold in moisture very well; if your hair feels smooth, that means you have high porosity, says Rhodes Douglas.

When your hair has good elasticity, that means it’s bouncy and full of life. “When you tug on a strand, you should be able to stretch it out and then it’ll go back,” says Rhodes Douglas. Chemicals, like those in hair dye, can mess with your elasticity and cause your hair to become limp, she adds.

To tell how much elasticity your hair has, try this little experiment: When your hair is wet, take a piece and stretch it out. If it returns to its original length once you release it, that means you have good elasticity.

Your hair density simply means how much hair you have. You can figure out whether you have low or high density hair by measuring the circumference of your ponytail, says Rhodes Douglas. The larger your ponytail circumference, the higher hair density you have. “People think they have a ton of hair, but often they don’t,” says Rhodes Douglas. “When gathered together, do you have a copious amount of hair or is it surprisingly less than you thought?”

It’s totally possible (and actually really common!) to have more than one type of curl pattern, says Rhodes Douglas. This is known as curl variance. “Often within curly hair types, you see tight curly hair and a more relaxed curl type,” says Connor. “If you have a mixture of manageable and difficult to manage hair types, I would use product for the hair type [that’s most difficult to manage].”

Ace the principles of healthy hair care. Ask Karline’s Salon about a routine that’s right for your hair type. For more information, call us at 561-471-0900 or make an appointment for your next visit.


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